Construction has begun!

Beth Kilmarx, Curator of the Link Collections, swings the hammer to begin construction!

Beth Kilmarx, Curator of the Link Collections, swings the hammer to begin construction!

Construction has begun on the creation of a permanent exhibit space dedicated to Edwin A. Link, his life and work, pulling materials from Link Collections, which are held in the Binghamton University Libraries Special Collections. The permanent exhibit will bring those collections to life and bring the lives of Edwin and Marion Link to students, faculty and staff.

This exhibit will honor Edwin A. Link and Marion Clayton Link and be a permanent installation in the Bartle Library and allow students, faculty, and other visitors to learn about the career of Link, the challenges he faced, the decisions he made and his commitment to innovation and invention. The exhibit will also serve to invigorate visitors’ sense of connection to history while highlighting the significance and uses of the library’s incomparable Link Collections.

Exhibits will include many aspects of Link’s life including his work with flight simulation and his work with underwater exploration.  Specific exhibit space will also be dedicated to Marion Link, to highlight her contributions to the Link legacy. We trust that this exhibit will capture the imagination of library visitors with original artifacts, photographs and manuscripts, along with engaging audiovisual displays.

The permanent exhibit will be in the North Reading Room, which is just outside of Special Collections on the second floor of the Glenn G. Bartle Library. The exhibit will be viewable during all hours the library is open allowing patrons to experience the Link Collections even if Special Collections is closed. It is our hope that the exhibit will attract students and other scholars and entice them to want to learn about Edwin A. Link, drawing them into Special Collections.  There they can use the materials for study and research thus nourishing their intellectual, aesthetic, and creative growth.

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